Series - Banned Book-A-Day

“Uncle Tom’s Cabin” is a novel written by Harriet Beecher Stowe. It was first published in serial form in an abolitionist newspaper in 1851-1852 and later as a book in 1852. The novel played a crucial role in shaping public opinion about slavery in the United States and is often credited with influencing the abolitionist cause.
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“Ulysses” is a novel written by Irish author James Joyce. It was first published in book form in 1922 and is widely regarded as one of the most important and challenging works of modernist literature. The novel takes its title from the Latinized name of Odysseus, the hero of Homer’s ancient Greek epic poem, “The Odyssey.”
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“The Awakening” is a novel written by American author Kate Chopin. It was first published in 1899 and is considered one of the early works of feminist literature. The novel explores themes of self-discovery, societal expectations, and the limitations imposed on women in the late 19th century.
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“Leaves of Grass” is a collection of poems written by the American poet Walt Whitman. It was first published in 1855 and underwent multiple revisions and expansions throughout Whitman’s life, with the final edition being published in 1892. The collection is considered one of the most important works in American literature and is known for its bold exploration of themes such as democracy, individualism, and the interconnectedness of all things.
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“Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass” is an autobiographical account written by Frederick Douglass. It was first published in 1845 and is considered one of the most influential pieces of literature to emerge from the abolitionist movement. The narrative provides a firsthand account of Douglass’s life as a slave and his journey to freedom.
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“The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling” is a novel written by the English author Henry Fielding. It was first published in 1749 and is considered one of the earliest examples of the English novel. The novel is known for its comedic and picaresque style, as well as its exploration of the social and moral issues of its time.
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