Genre - History

In Friedrich Nietzsche’s seminal work, “The Genealogy of Morals,” readers are plunged into a philosophical exploration of the origins and development of moral values. Nietzsche challenges conventional notions of morality and traces its evolution from its primitive roots to its modern manifestations. With piercing insight and provocative rhetoric, he delves into the psychological, cultural, and historical forces that shape human ethics, offering a radical critique of traditional… Read More

“Twelve Years a Slave” recounts the harrowing true story of Solomon Northup, a free African American man who was kidnapped and sold into slavery in the antebellum South. Through Northup’s own vivid and compelling narrative, readers are transported to the brutal world of plantation life, where human beings are treated as property and subjected to unimaginable cruelty. As Northup struggles to maintain his dignity and humanity in the face of oppression, his story serves as a power… Read More

The Articles of Confederation, ratified in 1781, served as the first constitution of the United States, following the nation’s declaration of independence from British rule. Crafted by the Second Continental Congress, this document aimed to provide a framework for governance among the newly formed states. However, its structure reflected a cautious approach to central authority, as the colonists were wary of repeating the abuses they had experienced under British rule.
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“Nonsenseorship” is a provocative exploration of censorship’s impact on society. Putnam delves into the absurdities of censorship, arguing for the vital importance of free expression. Through vivid examples and persuasive arguments, he challenges readers to reconsider the role of censorship in stifling creativity and intellectual freedom.
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“The Wealth of Nations” by Adam Smith revolutionized economic thought and remains a cornerstone of modern economics. In this seminal work, Smith explores the principles of capitalism, arguing that free markets, competition, and self-interest drive economic prosperity. Smith’s insights into the division of labor, the invisible hand of the market, and the role of government intervention continue to shape economic policy and theory to this day.
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In “Discourses,” Epictetus, a Stoic philosopher, shares timeless wisdom on ethics, personal development, and living a virtuous life. Drawing from his own experiences and observations, Epictetus offers practical advice on how to navigate life’s challenges with resilience and inner strength.
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“The Philosophy of Beards” by Thomas S. Gowing is a whimsical exploration of facial hair that transcends mere grooming advice to delve into the deeper cultural and philosophical significance of the beard. Gowing, a Victorian-era advocate for the beard, presents a spirited defense of facial hair as a symbol of masculinity, intellect, and individuality. Through witty anecdotes and historical anecdotes, Gowing celebrates the beard as a timeless symbol of rebellion against societal norms… Read More

Magna Carta, Latin for “Great Charter,” is a foundational document in English constitutional history. It was signed by King John of England at Runnymede on June 15, 1215, under pressure from rebellious barons seeking to limit the monarch’s power.
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The United States Constitution is the foundational legal document that establishes the framework for the American government and outlines the rights of its citizens. Drafted during the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787, it was ratified by the states in 1788 and went into effect in 1789.
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“The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire” by Edward Gibbon is a monumental work that traces the history of one of the most significant civilizations in human history. Spanning six volumes, Gibbon’s magisterial narrative offers a comprehensive examination of the rise, zenith, and eventual collapse of the Roman Empire.
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“A General History of the Pirates” also known as “A General History of the Pyrates” was written by Captain Charles Johnson, although the true identity of the author remains uncertain. The book was first published in 1724 under the title “A General History of the Robberies and Murders of the Most Notorious Pyrates” and is a comprehensive account of various pirates and their exploits during the “Golden Age of Piracy” in the late 17th and early 18th c… Read More

The King James Bible (KJV), also referred to as the Authorized Version (AV), is a classic English translation of the Bible. Commissioned by King James I of England and first published in 1611, it has had a profound impact on English literature and religious worship.
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“Ten Days That Shook the World” is a book written by the American journalist and socialist John Reed. It provides an eyewitness account of the October Revolution in Russia, which led to the establishment of the Soviet government.
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“Leviathan” is a philosophical work written by Thomas Hobbes, published in 1651. It is one of the most influential works of political philosophy and a cornerstone in the development of social contract theory.
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“The Dog’s Book of Verse, compiled by J. Earl Clauson, is a poetic anthology that joyfully commemorates the unique bond between dogs and their owners.”

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“A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court” is a novel written by American author Mark Twain. It was first published in 1889. The novel is a satirical work that combines elements of science fiction, time travel, and social commentary.
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Since the first day after the tragedy was announced, controversy has surrounded the death of rap and cultural icon Tupac Shakur. In this work, preeminent researcher on the topic, John Potash, puts forward his own theories of the events leading up to and following the murder in this meticulously researched and exhaustive account of the story.
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Seneca’s “Dialogues” encompass diverse letters and essays, delving into a broad spectrum of philosophical themes and offering practical guidance for embracing Stoic principles in daily living.
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“The Problems of Philosophy” is a philosophical work written by the British philosopher Bertrand Russell. It was first published in 1912. In this book, Russell explores various fundamental issues in philosophy, presenting his thoughts on topics such as the nature of reality, the limits of human knowledge, and the philosophy of language.
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The King James Bible (KJB), also known as The King James Version (KJV), and the Authorized Version (AV), is a classic English translation of the Bible. Commissioned by King James I of England and first published in 1611, it has had a profound impact on English literature and religious worship.
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The Quran, also known as Qur’an or Koran, is Islam’s central religious text, believed by Muslims to be a direct revelation from God.
 
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The Hebrew Tanakh represents the foundational religious and historical text for Judaism. It serves as a source of religious guidance, law, and inspiration for Jewish communities around the world.
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“Nicomachean Ethics” is a philosophical work by the ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle. It is named after Aristotle’s son, Nicomachus, to whom the work is dedicated. This ethical treatise, composed around 350 BCE, is part of Aristotle’s broader exploration of ethics and political philosophy.
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Discover chilling and mind-blowing facts in this ultimate collection of serial killer trivia for true crime fanatics.
This bloody and completely true trivia collection will horrify and intrigue readers, with answers to questions like “What was John Wayne Gacy’s last meal?”, “Which serial killer was captured because of a bloody footprint left on his victim?”, “Who was the FBI agent credited with coining the term ‘serial killer’?” and “How was one mass murderer able… Read More