Genre - Novel

“Les Misérables” by Victor Hugo is a monumental work of literature that delves into the intricacies of human suffering, redemption, and the pursuit of justice in 19th-century France. The novel intricately weaves together the lives of its diverse cast of characters, from the noble-hearted Jean Valjean to the relentless Inspector Javert, the tragic Fantine, and the idealistic revolutionary Marius Pontmercy. Through their intersecting narratives, Hugo paints a vivid portrait of a socie… Read More

“The Jungle” by Upton Sinclair, first published in 1906, is a seminal work of American literature that exposes the harsh realities of the meatpacking industry in Chicago. Sinclair’s novel follows the life of Jurgis Rudkus, a Lithuanian immigrant who arrives in America with dreams of prosperity, only to encounter exploitation, poverty, and despair. Through Jurgis’s harrowing experiences, Sinclair sheds light on the appalling working conditions, corruption, and lack of sani… Read More

“The Scarlet Letter” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, first published in 1850, is a classic work of American literature that delves into themes of sin, guilt, and redemption. Set in 17th-century Puritan Massachusetts, the novel follows Hester Prynne, a woman who bears an illegitimate child and is condemned to wear a scarlet letter “A” (for “adulteress”) on her chest as a mark of shame.
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Mark Twain’s “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” first published in 1884, is a cornerstone of American literature that explores themes of freedom, friendship, and moral growth through the journey of a young boy named Huck Finn. Escaping from his abusive father, Huck embarks on a raft journey down the Mississippi River, accompanied by Jim, a runaway slave seeking freedom. Their adventures and encounters with various characters reveal the social and racial injustices of the pre-Civ… Read More

“By Design” by J. Boykin Baker is a contemporary novel that delves into themes of faith, love, and personal growth.
When a young interior designer discovers that the exciting new man in her life is hiding a heart wrenching secret, she realizes it will take a lot more than sparks to ignite this romance.
This first novel in the By Design series is an emotional Christian romance that is guaranteed to touch the heart of anyone who has experienced the breathtaking intensity of a new lov… Read More

“Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen is a captivating novel that immerses readers in the complex social dynamics of early 19th-century England. Austen’s sharp wit and keen observation bring to life the world of the Bennet family, particularly the headstrong and independent Elizabeth Bennet, whose journey forms the heart of the novel. As Elizabeth navigates the intricacies of courtship and marriage in a society obsessed with social status and propriety, readers are drawn into a … Read More

In E. M. Forster’s “A Room with a View,” readers are swept into a captivating tale of love, self-discovery, and societal conventions. Through Forster’s vivid prose, we follow the journey of Lucy Honeychurch, a young Englishwoman who embarks on a journey of personal growth and transformation during a trip to Italy. As Lucy navigates the complexities of Edwardian society and grapples with her own desires and aspirations, she finds herself torn between the expectations of he… Read More

H.G. Wells’ “War of the Worlds” catapults readers into a thrilling tale of extraterrestrial invasion, where Martians descend upon Earth with devastating force. Through Wells’ vivid prose, the reader witnesses the chaos and destruction wrought by the ruthless Martian invaders, whose advanced technology overwhelms humanity’s defenses.
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“The Idiot” by Fyodor Dostoevsky plunges readers into the complex world of 19th-century Russia, where protagonist Prince Lev Nikolaevich Myshkin navigates the intricacies of human nature and societal conventions. As Myshkin returns to St. Petersburg after being treated for epilepsy in Switzerland, he finds himself thrust into the midst of high society, where he encounters a cast of characters grappling with their own moral dilemmas and inner demons.
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“The Cosmic Computer” is a science fiction novel written by H. Beam Piper, first published in 1963. Set in a distant future where humanity has colonized various planets, the story follows Conn Maxwell, who returns to his home planet of Poictesme to find it in decline. Determined to revive the planet’s economy, Conn embarks on a quest to uncover the fabled supercomputer known as Merlin, rumored to hold vast knowledge and power.
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Victor Hugo’s “The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” first published in French in 1831 as Notre-Dame de Paris, captivating readers with its vivid portrayal of medieval Paris and its unforgettable cast of characters. At the heart of the narrative is Quasimodo, the hunchbacked bell-ringer of Notre Dame Cathedral, whose life becomes intertwined with that of the beautiful and enigmatic Esmeralda, a gypsy girl.
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Bram Stoker’s “Dracula” presents a chilling narrative that grips readers with its evocative prose and haunting atmosphere.
First published in 1897, it is a seminal work of Gothic horror literature that has left an indelible mark on the genre. The novel unfolds as an epistolary narrative, composed of journal entries, letters, and newspaper clippings, offering readers a chilling firsthand account of the terrifying events that unfold.
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Hermann Hesse’s “Siddhartha,” published in 1922, remains a timeless testament to humanity’s universal quest for self-discovery and spiritual fulfillment.
In ancient India, Siddhartha, a young Brahmin, sets out on a journey for enlightenment and fulfillment. Along the way, he encounters diverse teachings, experiences, and mentors, shaping his evolving comprehension of existence and reality.
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In Edgar Rice Burroughs’ science fiction masterpiece, “A Princess of Mars,” readers are transported to a captivating world of adventure and intrigue. Set on the exotic and mysterious planet of Barsoom (Mars), the novel follows the remarkable journey of John Carter, a Confederate veteran who finds himself mysteriously transported to the red planet.
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The secretive darkness once again brooded over Cuervo del Drache—as it had done for centuries.
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Apuleius wrote “The Golden Ass,” also known as “Metamorphoses,” an ancient Roman novel in the second century AD. The story follows Lucius, a young man who, after experimenting with magic, transforms into a donkey. This transformation leads Lucius on whimsical adventures where he encounters diverse characters and experiences both humor and profundity.
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“Jane Eyre” is a novel written by Charlotte Brontë and published in 1847 under the pseudonym “Currer Bell.” It is considered one of the greatest works of English literature and a classic of the Victorian era.
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“The Phantom of the Opera” is a Gothic novel written by French author Gaston Leroux. It was first serialized in the French newspaper “Le Gaulois” from September 1909 to January 1910. It was later published as a novel in 1910. The novel combines elements of mystery, romance, and horror.
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“The Mysterious Affair at Styles” is a detective novel by Agatha Christie, and it marks the debut of her iconic fictional detective, Hercule Poirot.
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“Middlemarch” is a novel written by English author George Eliot (the pen name of Mary Ann Evans). The novel was first published in eight installments between 1871 and 1872.
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“Uncle Tom’s Cabin” is a novel written by Harriet Beecher Stowe. It was first published in serial form in an abolitionist newspaper in 1851-1852 and later as a book in 1852. The novel played a crucial role in shaping public opinion about slavery in the United States and is often credited with influencing the abolitionist cause.
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“Ulysses” is a novel written by Irish author James Joyce. It was first published in book form in 1922 and is widely regarded as one of the most important and challenging works of modernist literature. The novel takes its title from the Latinized name of Odysseus, the hero of Homer’s ancient Greek epic poem, “The Odyssey.”
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“The Awakening” is a novel written by American author Kate Chopin. It was first published in 1899 and is considered one of the early works of feminist literature. The novel explores themes of self-discovery, societal expectations, and the limitations imposed on women in the late 19th century.
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“The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling” is a novel written by the English author Henry Fielding. It was first published in 1749 and is considered one of the earliest examples of the English novel. The novel is known for its comedic and picaresque style, as well as its exploration of the social and moral issues of its time.
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