Genre - Philosophy

In Friedrich Nietzsche’s seminal work, “The Genealogy of Morals,” readers are plunged into a philosophical exploration of the origins and development of moral values. Nietzsche challenges conventional notions of morality and traces its evolution from its primitive roots to its modern manifestations. With piercing insight and provocative rhetoric, he delves into the psychological, cultural, and historical forces that shape human ethics, offering a radical critique of traditional… Read More

The “Tao Te Ching” is a foundational text in Taoism, an ancient Chinese philosophical and religious tradition, written around 400 BC.
It is a collection of 81 short chapters, each containing poetic and philosophical verses. The text explores the concept of the Tao (Dao), which can be translated as the “Way” or the “Path.” The Tao represents the fundamental and unnameable force that underlies and unifies the universe.
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“The Wealth of Nations” by Adam Smith revolutionized economic thought and remains a cornerstone of modern economics. In this seminal work, Smith explores the principles of capitalism, arguing that free markets, competition, and self-interest drive economic prosperity. Smith’s insights into the division of labor, the invisible hand of the market, and the role of government intervention continue to shape economic policy and theory to this day.
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In “Discourses,” Epictetus, a Stoic philosopher, shares timeless wisdom on ethics, personal development, and living a virtuous life. Drawing from his own experiences and observations, Epictetus offers practical advice on how to navigate life’s challenges with resilience and inner strength.
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“The Philosophy of Beards” by Thomas S. Gowing is a whimsical exploration of facial hair that transcends mere grooming advice to delve into the deeper cultural and philosophical significance of the beard. Gowing, a Victorian-era advocate for the beard, presents a spirited defense of facial hair as a symbol of masculinity, intellect, and individuality. Through witty anecdotes and historical anecdotes, Gowing celebrates the beard as a timeless symbol of rebellion against societal norms… Read More

“What Is Property?” by Pierre-Joseph Proudhon is a foundational work in political philosophy, challenging conventional notions of ownership and advocating for social equality. Published in 1840, it sparked debates on property rights and economic justice.
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In “A General View of Positivism,” Auguste Comte lays the groundwork for a new approach to understanding society, emphasizing the importance of scientific inquiry and empirical observation in the pursuit of knowledge. His ideas continue to shape the fields of sociology and philosophy, inspiring generations of scholars and thinkers to explore the complexities of human society through a scientific lens.
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“Ethics” (sometimes referred to as “Ethics, Demonstrated in Geometrical Order”) is a philosophical work written by Benedictus de Spinoza, a Dutch philosopher of the 17th century. Spinoza is considered one of the rationalist philosophers of the period and is known for his contributions to metaphysics, epistemology, and political philosophy.
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“The Public and Its Problems” is a book written by American philosopher John Dewey. It was first published in 1927 and is one of Dewey’s major works in political philosophy. The book explores the nature of publics, the challenges of democracy, and the relationship between individuals and society.
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“The Consolation of Philosophy” is a philosophical work written by the Roman statesman and philosopher Boethius around the year 524 AD while he was in prison awaiting execution. The book is considered one of the most important and influential philosophical works of the Middle Ages.
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Seneca’s “Dialogues” encompass diverse letters and essays, delving into a broad spectrum of philosophical themes and offering practical guidance for embracing Stoic principles in daily living.
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“The Critique of Pure Reason” is a philosophical work by Immanuel Kant, first published in 1781. It is one of Kant’s major works and is considered a cornerstone in modern Western philosophy. The book addresses fundamental questions about human knowledge, metaphysics, and the nature of reality.
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“The Problems of Philosophy” is a philosophical work written by the British philosopher Bertrand Russell. It was first published in 1912. In this book, Russell explores various fundamental issues in philosophy, presenting his thoughts on topics such as the nature of reality, the limits of human knowledge, and the philosophy of language.
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“Nicomachean Ethics” is a philosophical work by the ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle. It is named after Aristotle’s son, Nicomachus, to whom the work is dedicated. This ethical treatise, composed around 350 BCE, is part of Aristotle’s broader exploration of ethics and political philosophy.
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“Dream Psychology” is a book written by Sigmund Freud, the renowned Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis. Originally published in 1920, the book explores Freud’s theories on the interpretation of dreams and their connection to the unconscious mind.
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The “Tao Te Ching” is a foundational text in Taoism, an ancient Chinese philosophical and religious tradition, written around 400 BC.
It is a collection of 81 short chapters, each containing poetic and philosophical verses. The text explores the concept of the Tao (Dao), which can be translated as the “Way” or the “Path.” The Tao represents the fundamental and unnameable force that underlies and unifies the universe.
Read More

“A Treatise of Human Nature” is a philosophical work by the Scottish philosopher David Hume, first published in three volumes in 1739 and 1740. Hume is widely regarded as one of the most important figures in Western philosophy and a key figure in the Scottish Enlightenment.
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“Walden or Life in the Woods” is a book written by American transcendentalist author Henry David Thoreau. It was first published in 1854 and is a reflection on simple living in natural surroundings. The book is part personal declaration of independence, social experiment, voyage of spiritual discovery, satire, and manual for self-reliance.
Thoreau wrote “Walden” during a two-year period when he lived in a cabin he built near Walden Pond, located in Concord, Massachusetts. The book docume… Read More

The “Kama Sutra” is an ancient Indian text that is widely considered to be the standard work on human sexual behavior. The text was written in Sanskrit and is believed to have been composed in the 3rd century CE by the Indian scholar Vatsyayana. It is divided into seven parts, each of which deals with a different aspect of human life and sexuality. The “Kama Sutra” covers a wide range of topics, including the duties and responsibilities of partners in a sexual relationship, the importanc… Read More