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“Emma” is a novel written by Jane Austen, first published in 1815. It is one of Austen’s most well-known works and is considered a classic of English literature. The novel is a comedy of manners and a satire of the social class and gender roles of the early 19th century.
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“Scary Fiction Shorts” showcases Lovecraft’s mastery of cosmic horror, where ancient and unknowable forces challenge human understanding, often leading to madness and despair.
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“Lady Chatterley’s Lover” is a novel written by D.H. Lawrence, first published privately in 1928. The novel explores themes of love, sexuality, and class struggle.
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“The Surprising Adventures of Baron Munchausen” is a collection of tall tales and fantastical stories attributed to the German nobleman Baron Munchausen. The character Baron Munchausen was based on a real person, Hieronymus Karl Friedrich, Freiherr von Münchhausen, who lived in the 18th century.
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Aesop’s Fables are a collection of ancient moral tales attributed to Aesop, a storyteller believed to have lived in ancient Greece around the 6th century BCE.
These fables have endured through the centuries and remain popular as a source of wisdom and moral lessons.
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“The Jungle” is a novel written by Upton Sinclair, first published in 1906. The book is a muckraking work of fiction that exposed the harsh working conditions and unsanitary practices in the American meatpacking industry during the early 20th century. Sinclair intended the novel to highlight the exploitation of immigrant workers and to advocate for socialist reforms.
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“The Mark of Zorro” is a novel written by Johnston McCulley, first published in 1919. The story has been adapted into various films, television series, and other media over the years. The novel introduces the character of Zorro, a masked vigilante who defends the oppressed in Spanish California during the era of Mexican rule.
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“Stand by for Mars!” is a science fiction novel written by Carey Rockwell, a pseudonym used by the authors Harold L. Goodwin and Willy Ley. The book was published in 1952 and is part of the “Tom Corbett, Space Cadet” series.
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“The Invisible Man” is a classic science fiction novel written by H.G. Wells. It was first published in 1897 and is considered one of Wells’ most famous works. The novel explores the theme of scientific ethics and the consequences of unchecked scientific experimentation.
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“Theodore Roosevelt: An Autobiography” is an autobiographical work written by the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt. Roosevelt wrote the autobiography in 1913 and published it in 1914, shortly after the end of his presidency (1901–1909). The book covers Roosevelt’s early life, political career, and experiences as president.
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“The Iliad” is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems by Homer. The poem, set near the end of the Trojan War, depicts an intense quarrel between King Agamemnon and the legendary warrior Achilles. The poem is often widely known as the first substantial piece of European literature.
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“The Sun Also Rises” is a novel written by American author Ernest Hemingway. It was published in 1926 and is considered one of Hemingway’s most famous works. The novel is often seen as a quintessential piece of literature from the “Lost Generation,” a term used to describe the disillusionment and aimlessness experienced by many individuals in the aftermath of World War I.
The story is primarily set in the 1920s and follows a group of expatriates, mainly American and British, as they na… Read More

“The Brothers Karamazov” is a novel written by the renowned Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky. It was first published in 1880 and is considered one of Dostoevsky’s masterpieces and a classic of world literature.
The novel is a complex and sprawling work that explores profound philosophical, ethical, and psychological themes. It revolves around the relationships and conflicts within the Karamazov family, consisting of the father, Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov, and his three sons: Dmitri, Ivan, … Read More

The World’s First-Ever DEA Audiobook, presented by Book.io.
“Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” is a novel written by Lewis Carroll in 1865. The story follows a young girl named Alice who falls down a rabbit hole and finds herself in a fantastical world filled with talking animals, mad hatters, and playing cards that have come to life. As she navigates this strange new world, Alice encounters a variety of peculiar characters and experiences a series of surreal adventures. The book explore… Read More

“Poetry” is a collection of popular poems, written by Edgar Allan Poe. His poetry is renowned for its Gothic and melancholic themes, known for its musical and rhythmic qualities, and he often used rhyme and meter to create a haunting and atmospheric mood. His works have had a lasting impact on the genres of horror and Gothic literature, and he is considered one of the most significant and influential American writers of the 19th century.
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“The Turn of the Screw” is a novella written by Henry James, an American-British author, and was first published in 1898. It is a work of gothic fiction and is known for its ambiguity and psychological complexity.
The story is narrated by an unnamed governess who is hired to take care of two orphaned children, Miles and Flora, at Bly, a remote country estate in England. As the governess settles into her role, she becomes increasingly troubled by strange and eerie occurrences. She starts to s… Read More

“The King in Yellow” is a fictional play within a book of the same name, written by American author Robert W. Chambers. The book is a collection of interconnected weird and supernatural short stories published in 1895. The play “The King in Yellow” is a central and recurring motif in the stories.
In the fictional universe created by Chambers, “The King in Yellow” is a mysterious and forbidden play. It is described as a two-act play of incomparable beauty and dreadfulness. Those who r… Read More

“Walden or Life in the Woods” is a book written by American transcendentalist author Henry David Thoreau. It was first published in 1854 and is a reflection on simple living in natural surroundings. The book is part personal declaration of independence, social experiment, voyage of spiritual discovery, satire, and manual for self-reliance.
Thoreau wrote “Walden” during a two-year period when he lived in a cabin he built near Walden Pond, located in Concord, Massachusetts. The book docume… Read More

“Paradise Lost” is an epic poem written by the English poet John Milton. It was first published in 1667 and later revised in 1674. The poem is considered one of the greatest literary works in the English language and a seminal piece of epic poetry.
The story of “Paradise Lost” is based on Christian theology and draws heavily from the Bible, particularly the accounts of the Fall of Man in the Book of Genesis. The poem narrates the biblical story of the rebellion of Satan and his followers… Read More

“The Picture of Dorian Gray” is a novel written by the Irish author Oscar Wilde. It was first published in 1890 and is considered one of Wilde’s most famous and enduring works. The novel is known for its exploration of themes related to aestheticism, moral corruption, the nature of beauty, and the consequences of indulgence.
The story revolves around the character of Dorian Gray, a young and handsome man living in Victorian-era London. Dorian becomes the subject of a portrait painted by hi… Read More

“Heart of Darkness” is a novella written by Joseph Conrad, first published in 1899. It is considered one of the most important works in English literature and a classic of modernist literature. The story is framed as a narrative within a narrative and is primarily set in the Congo Free State (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo) during the late 19th century, during the height of European colonialism in Africa.
The novella follows the journey of Charles Marlow, an English seaman and narr… Read More

“The Wind in the Willows” is a classic children’s novel written by British author Kenneth Grahame. The book was first published in 1908 and has since become one of the most beloved works of children’s literature.
The Wind in the Willows received negative reviews upon its initial release, but it has since become a classic of British literature. It was listed at No. 16 in the BBC’s survey The Big Read and has been adapted multiple times in different media.
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The Hardy Boys is a popular series of mystery novels for young readers created by the American writer Edward Stratemeyer. The series features two teenage brothers, Frank and Joe Hardy, who solve various mysteries and crimes in the fictional town of Bayport.
“The Tower Treasure” (1927): In the first book, Frank and Joe Hardy’s father, Fenton Hardy, a private detective, is hired to locate some stolen jewelry. When he gets injured during the investigation, the Hardy boys take over the case. T… Read More

“King Lear” is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare. It is one of his most famous and enduring plays, believed to have been written between 1605 and 1606. The play tells the story of King Lear, an aging monarch who decides to divide his kingdom among his three daughters based on their professions of love for him. However, the distribution of the kingdom leads to treachery, betrayal, and ultimately tragic consequences.
The central themes of “King Lear” include the nature of power, the… Read More