Genre - Non-Fiction

In Frederick Talbot’s “Moving Pictures,” readers are taken on a captivating journey through the history and significance of cinema. Talbot provides a comprehensive examination of the evolution of film, from its humble beginnings as a novelty to its transformation into a powerful cultural phenomenon. Through vivid storytelling and meticulous research, he traces the technological advancements, artistic innovations, and societal influences that have shaped the medium over the deca… Read More

An Education in Service Management – A guide to building a successful service management career and delivering organisational success.
IT is a business-critical function. It delivers experiences, stimulates strategic shifts, and protects organisations from theft, cyber attacks, and the related regulatory, reputational and financial impacts.
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Own a limited Collector’s Edition of the Stuff.io Whitepaper with 500 one-of-one book covers. Stuff.io is the home for fully decentralized and encrypted Music, Video, Podcasts, and other media you truly own. Gain insight into a new era of digital media and how it will benefit consumers and creators alike.
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“By Design” by J. Boykin Baker is a contemporary novel that delves into themes of faith, love, and personal growth.
When a young interior designer discovers that the exciting new man in her life is hiding a heart wrenching secret, she realizes it will take a lot more than sparks to ignite this romance.
This first novel in the By Design series is an emotional Christian romance that is guaranteed to touch the heart of anyone who has experienced the breathtaking intensity of a new lov… Read More

In Friedrich Nietzsche’s seminal work, “The Genealogy of Morals,” readers are plunged into a philosophical exploration of the origins and development of moral values. Nietzsche challenges conventional notions of morality and traces its evolution from its primitive roots to its modern manifestations. With piercing insight and provocative rhetoric, he delves into the psychological, cultural, and historical forces that shape human ethics, offering a radical critique of traditional… Read More

“Twelve Years a Slave” recounts the harrowing true story of Solomon Northup, a free African American man who was kidnapped and sold into slavery in the antebellum South. Through Northup’s own vivid and compelling narrative, readers are transported to the brutal world of plantation life, where human beings are treated as property and subjected to unimaginable cruelty. As Northup struggles to maintain his dignity and humanity in the face of oppression, his story serves as a power… Read More

The Articles of Confederation, ratified in 1781, served as the first constitution of the United States, following the nation’s declaration of independence from British rule. Crafted by the Second Continental Congress, this document aimed to provide a framework for governance among the newly formed states. However, its structure reflected a cautious approach to central authority, as the colonists were wary of repeating the abuses they had experienced under British rule.
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In “The Strangest Things in the World” by Thomas R. Henry, readers are taken on a fascinating journey through a myriad of oddities and curiosities from around the globe. With meticulous research and engaging storytelling, Henry uncovers the most bizarre phenomena and peculiar occurrences, inviting readers to delve into the extraordinary and the inexplicable. From natural wonders to supernatural encounters, each chapter presents a captivating exploration of the world’s strangest… Read More

The “Tao Te Ching” is a foundational text in Taoism, an ancient Chinese philosophical and religious tradition, written around 400 BC.
It is a collection of 81 short chapters, each containing poetic and philosophical verses. The text explores the concept of the Tao (Dao), which can be translated as the “Way” or the “Path.” The Tao represents the fundamental and unnameable force that underlies and unifies the universe.
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“Nonsenseorship” is a provocative exploration of censorship’s impact on society. Putnam delves into the absurdities of censorship, arguing for the vital importance of free expression. Through vivid examples and persuasive arguments, he challenges readers to reconsider the role of censorship in stifling creativity and intellectual freedom.
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“The Prophet,” written by Kahlil Gibran, stands as a timeless masterpiece that transcends generations with its profound wisdom and poetic beauty. Gibran’s work invites readers on a spiritual journey through the teachings of a prophet named Almustafa, who shares his insights on various aspects of life, including love, marriage, freedom, and death. Gibran’s writing style, characterized by its lyrical prose and profound simplicity, captivates readers, drawing them into a wor… Read More

In “Discourses,” Epictetus, a Stoic philosopher, shares timeless wisdom on ethics, personal development, and living a virtuous life. Drawing from his own experiences and observations, Epictetus offers practical advice on how to navigate life’s challenges with resilience and inner strength.
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“The Wealth of Nations” by Adam Smith revolutionized economic thought and remains a cornerstone of modern economics. In this seminal work, Smith explores the principles of capitalism, arguing that free markets, competition, and self-interest drive economic prosperity. Smith’s insights into the division of labor, the invisible hand of the market, and the role of government intervention continue to shape economic policy and theory to this day.
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The Egyptian Book of the Dead, translated by Peter Le Page Renouf and Edouard Naville, is an ancient funerary text originating from ancient Egypt. It consists of a collection of spells, hymns, and rituals aimed at guiding the deceased through the afterlife and ensuring their safe passage to the realm of the gods. These texts were often inscribed on papyrus scrolls and buried with the deceased to provide guidance and protection in the journey to the underworld. The Book of the Dead reflects the a… Read More

The Book of Mormon, a foundational text in the Latter-day Saint movement, first published in 1830, marking the culmination of a series of revelations received by Joseph Smith, Jr., the movement’s founder. The book claims to be a record of ancient American prophets, chronicling their interactions with God and their religious and political struggles.
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The Bhagavad-Gîtâ is a sacred Hindu scripture, translated by Sr. Edwin Arnold, offers profound philosophical teachings and spiritual insights as it unfolds a dialogue between Prince Arjuna and Lord Krishna on the battlefield of Kurukshetra. Through this conversation, Arjuna grapples with moral dilemmas and existential questions while seeking guidance from Krishna, who imparts timeless wisdom and guidance on duty, righteousness, and the path to spiritual liberation. The Gita’s teachings t… Read More

Book.io Con ’24 Exclusive
Dante Alighieri wrote “The Divine Comedy,” crafting it as an epic poem that stands as one of the pinnacles of world literature and Italian literary tradition. Divided into three parts – Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso – the poem narrates Dante’s journey through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven, respectively.
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“The Philosophy of Beards” by Thomas S. Gowing is a whimsical exploration of facial hair that transcends mere grooming advice to delve into the deeper cultural and philosophical significance of the beard. Gowing, a Victorian-era advocate for the beard, presents a spirited defense of facial hair as a symbol of masculinity, intellect, and individuality. Through witty anecdotes and historical anecdotes, Gowing celebrates the beard as a timeless symbol of rebellion against societal norms… Read More

“What Is Property?” by Pierre-Joseph Proudhon is a foundational work in political philosophy, challenging conventional notions of ownership and advocating for social equality. Published in 1840, it sparked debates on property rights and economic justice.
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In “A General View of Positivism,” Auguste Comte lays the groundwork for a new approach to understanding society, emphasizing the importance of scientific inquiry and empirical observation in the pursuit of knowledge. His ideas continue to shape the fields of sociology and philosophy, inspiring generations of scholars and thinkers to explore the complexities of human society through a scientific lens.
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The Federalist Papers also known as The Federalist, comprising of 85 articles and essays, were written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay between 1787 and 1788. These essays, published under the pseudonym “Publius,” aimed to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution. Addressing various aspects of government structure and individual rights, the papers serve as a foundational text in American political thought.
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The first edition of Webster’s Dictionary, known as “An American Dictionary of the English Language,” was published in 1828 by Noah Webster, an American lexicographer, grammarian, and language reformer.
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“The Story of Eclipses” by George Chambers delves into the captivating celestial phenomena of eclipses, offering readers a comprehensive exploration of these awe-inspiring events. Chambers, renowned for his expertise in astronomy, provides a detailed account of the scientific principles behind eclipses, unraveling the mysteries of these celestial occurrences with clarity and precision.
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Hermann Hesse’s “Siddhartha,” published in 1922, remains a timeless testament to humanity’s universal quest for self-discovery and spiritual fulfillment.
In ancient India, Siddhartha, a young Brahmin, sets out on a journey for enlightenment and fulfillment. Along the way, he encounters diverse teachings, experiences, and mentors, shaping his evolving comprehension of existence and reality.
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