Genre - Literature

“Les Misérables” by Victor Hugo is a monumental work of literature that delves into the intricacies of human suffering, redemption, and the pursuit of justice in 19th-century France. The novel intricately weaves together the lives of its diverse cast of characters, from the noble-hearted Jean Valjean to the relentless Inspector Javert, the tragic Fantine, and the idealistic revolutionary Marius Pontmercy. Through their intersecting narratives, Hugo paints a vivid portrait of a socie… Read More

“On the Nature of Things” (De Rerum Natura) by Titus Lucretius Carus is a seminal work of ancient Roman literature and philosophy, written in the 1st century BCE. This epic poem, composed in six books, aims to explain the physical world through the lens of Epicurean philosophy, which Lucretius ardently followed.
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Giovanni Boccaccio’s “The Decameron” transports readers to 14th-century Italy during the devastating Black Death. In this vivid narrative, ten young Florentines—seven women and three men—flee their plague-stricken city to seek refuge in a serene villa in the countryside. To pass the time and keep their spirits high, they each take turns telling stories over ten days, culminating in a rich tapestry of one hundred diverse tales.
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F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “Tales of the Jazz Age” captures the essence of the Roaring Twenties with a vibrant collection of short stories that explore the era’s exuberance, excess, and underlying disillusionment. Published in 1922, this anthology reflects Fitzgerald’s keen observations of the social dynamics and cultural shifts that defined the Jazz Age. Each story delves into different facets of the time, from the flamboyant lifestyles of the rich and glamorous to the … Read More

Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Canterbury Tales” transports readers to the vibrant and diverse world of medieval England, offering a panoramic view of society through the lens of a group of pilgrims journeying to the shrine of Thomas Becket in Canterbury. Written in Middle English in the late 14th century, Chaucer’s magnum opus is a rich tapestry of storytelling, wit, and social commentary. Through a series of interconnected tales told by a colorful cast of characters from vario… Read More

Gustave Flaubert’s “Madame Bovary” takes readers on a journey into the tumultuous life of Emma Bovary, a young woman trapped in the suffocating confines of bourgeois society in 19th-century France. As Emma grapples with the monotony of her provincial existence and yearns for a life of passion and excitement, she embarks on a series of ill-fated affairs and reckless pursuits in pursuit of her romantic ideals. Flaubert’s narrative skillfully depicts Emma’s descent int… Read More

“The Prophet,” written by Kahlil Gibran, stands as a timeless masterpiece that transcends generations with its profound wisdom and poetic beauty. Gibran’s work invites readers on a spiritual journey through the teachings of a prophet named Almustafa, who shares his insights on various aspects of life, including love, marriage, freedom, and death. Gibran’s writing style, characterized by its lyrical prose and profound simplicity, captivates readers, drawing them into a wor… Read More

“The Idiot” by Fyodor Dostoevsky plunges readers into the complex world of 19th-century Russia, where protagonist Prince Lev Nikolaevich Myshkin navigates the intricacies of human nature and societal conventions. As Myshkin returns to St. Petersburg after being treated for epilepsy in Switzerland, he finds himself thrust into the midst of high society, where he encounters a cast of characters grappling with their own moral dilemmas and inner demons.
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Dante Alighieri wrote “The Divine Comedy,” crafting it as an epic poem that stands as one of the pinnacles of world literature and Italian literary tradition. Divided into three parts – Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso – the poem narrates Dante’s journey through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven, respectively.
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In “The Red Badge of Courage,” written by Stephen Crane, readers are thrust into the heart of the American Civil War, where they witness the transformation of a young soldier named Henry Fleming. As Henry grapples with fear, uncertainty, and the brutal realities of war, he embarks on a journey of self-discovery and redemption. Through Henry’s eyes, readers are immersed in the chaos and turmoil of battle, experiencing the horrors and triumphs of war a… Read More

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Victor Hugo’s “The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” first published in French in 1831 as Notre-Dame de Paris, captivating readers with its vivid portrayal of medieval Paris and its unforgettable cast of characters. At the heart of the narrative is Quasimodo, the hunchbacked bell-ringer of Notre Dame Cathedral, whose life becomes intertwined with that of the beautiful and enigmatic Esmeralda, a gypsy girl.
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In Mark Twain’s timeless novel “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,” readers are thrust into the lively world of a mischievous young boy named Tom Sawyer. Set in the fictional town of St. Petersburg, Missouri, along the banks of the Mississippi River, the story unfolds as Tom embarks on a series of daring escapades and thrilling adventures. From whitewashing a fence to searching for buried treasure, Tom’s exploits captivate readers and offer a glimpse into the carefree days of … Read More

“Little Women” by Louisa May Alcott is a timeless classic that has enchanted readers for generations. Published in 1868, this beloved novel follows the lives of the four March sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy—as they navigate the trials and triumphs of adolescence in Civil War-era New England.
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“Just So Stories” is a collection of whimsical and imaginative children’s stories written by Rudyard Kipling, first published in 1902. The book is notable for its engaging storytelling and inventive explanations for the origins of various phenomena in the natural world.
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“North and South” is a novel written by Elizabeth Gaskell, first published in 1855. It is set in the fictional industrial town of Milton in northern England during the 19th century and explores the social and economic differences between the industrial North and the agricultural South of England.
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“Ulysses” is a novel written by Irish author James Joyce. It was first published in book form in 1922 and is widely regarded as one of the most important and challenging works of modernist literature. The novel takes its title from the Latinized name of Odysseus, the hero of Homer’s ancient Greek epic poem, “The Odyssey.”
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“Leaves of Grass” is a collection of poems written by the American poet Walt Whitman. It was first published in 1855 and underwent multiple revisions and expansions throughout Whitman’s life, with the final edition being published in 1892. The collection is considered one of the most important works in American literature and is known for its bold exploration of themes such as democracy, individualism, and the interconnectedness of all things.
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“The Consolation of Philosophy” is a philosophical work written by the Roman statesman and philosopher Boethius around the year 524 AD while he was in prison awaiting execution. The book is considered one of the most important and influential philosophical works of the Middle Ages.
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“The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling” is a novel written by the English author Henry Fielding. It was first published in 1749 and is considered one of the earliest examples of the English novel. The novel is known for its comedic and picaresque style, as well as its exploration of the social and moral issues of its time.
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“Candide” is a satirical novella written by the French philosopher and author Voltaire. Published in 1759, the work is a philosophical and humorous exploration of the optimism prevalent in the 18th century Enlightenment period.
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“Moby Dick” is a novel written by Herman Melville, first published in 1851. It is one of the most famous works of American literature and is considered a classic. The novel is known for its intricate and symbolic narrative, as well as its exploration of themes such as obsession, revenge, and the nature of good and evil.
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“Emma” is a novel written by Jane Austen, first published in 1815. It is one of Austen’s most well-known works and is considered a classic of English literature. The novel is a comedy of manners and a satire of the social class and gender roles of the early 19th century.
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“The Voyage Out” is the first novel written by British author Virginia Woolf. It was published in 1915. The novel is a coming-of-age story, and it explores themes such as self-discovery, social conventions, and the constraints placed upon women in the early 20th century.
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“Brave New World” is a dystopian novel written by Aldous Huxley and published in 1932. The story is set in a futuristic society where individuals are genetically engineered and conditioned to conform to the rules and values of their class, and where pleasure-seeking and consumption are the primary goals of life.
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