Genre - Classics

“Ulysses” is a novel written by Irish author James Joyce. It was first published in book form in 1922 and is widely regarded as one of the most important and challenging works of modernist literature. The novel takes its title from the Latinized name of Odysseus, the hero of Homer’s ancient Greek epic poem, “The Odyssey.”
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“Leaves of Grass” is a collection of poems written by the American poet Walt Whitman. It was first published in 1855 and underwent multiple revisions and expansions throughout Whitman’s life, with the final edition being published in 1892. The collection is considered one of the most important works in American literature and is known for its bold exploration of themes such as democracy, individualism, and the interconnectedness of all things.
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“The Consolation of Philosophy” is a philosophical work written by the Roman statesman and philosopher Boethius around the year 524 AD while he was in prison awaiting execution. The book is considered one of the most important and influential philosophical works of the Middle Ages.
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“The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling” is a novel written by the English author Henry Fielding. It was first published in 1749 and is considered one of the earliest examples of the English novel. The novel is known for its comedic and picaresque style, as well as its exploration of the social and moral issues of its time.
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“Candide” is a satirical novella written by the French philosopher and author Voltaire. Published in 1759, the work is a philosophical and humorous exploration of the optimism prevalent in the 18th century Enlightenment period.
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“Moby Dick” is a novel written by Herman Melville, first published in 1851. It is one of the most famous works of American literature and is considered a classic. The novel is known for its intricate and symbolic narrative, as well as its exploration of themes such as obsession, revenge, and the nature of good and evil.
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“Emma” is a novel written by Jane Austen, first published in 1815. It is one of Austen’s most well-known works and is considered a classic of English literature. The novel is a comedy of manners and a satire of the social class and gender roles of the early 19th century.
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“Scary Fiction Shorts” showcases Lovecraft’s mastery of cosmic horror, where ancient and unknowable forces challenge human understanding, often leading to madness and despair.
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“The Critique of Pure Reason” is a philosophical work by Immanuel Kant, first published in 1781. It is one of Kant’s major works and is considered a cornerstone in modern Western philosophy. The book addresses fundamental questions about human knowledge, metaphysics, and the nature of reality.
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“The Problems of Philosophy” is a philosophical work written by the British philosopher Bertrand Russell. It was first published in 1912. In this book, Russell explores various fundamental issues in philosophy, presenting his thoughts on topics such as the nature of reality, the limits of human knowledge, and the philosophy of language.
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“Nicomachean Ethics” is a philosophical work by the ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle. It is named after Aristotle’s son, Nicomachus, to whom the work is dedicated. This ethical treatise, composed around 350 BCE, is part of Aristotle’s broader exploration of ethics and political philosophy.
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“Dream Psychology” is a book written by Sigmund Freud, the renowned Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis. Originally published in 1920, the book explores Freud’s theories on the interpretation of dreams and their connection to the unconscious mind.
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“The Voyage Out” is the first novel written by British author Virginia Woolf. It was published in 1915. The novel is a coming-of-age story, and it explores themes such as self-discovery, social conventions, and the constraints placed upon women in the early 20th century.
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The “Tao Te Ching” is a foundational text in Taoism, an ancient Chinese philosophical and religious tradition, written around 400 BC.
It is a collection of 81 short chapters, each containing poetic and philosophical verses. The text explores the concept of the Tao (Dao), which can be translated as the “Way” or the “Path.” The Tao represents the fundamental and unnameable force that underlies and unifies the universe.
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“Brave New World” is a dystopian novel written by Aldous Huxley and published in 1932. The story is set in a futuristic society where individuals are genetically engineered and conditioned to conform to the rules and values of their class, and where pleasure-seeking and consumption are the primary goals of life.
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“The Surprising Adventures of Baron Munchausen” is a collection of tall tales and fantastical stories attributed to the German nobleman Baron Munchausen. The character Baron Munchausen was based on a real person, Hieronymus Karl Friedrich, Freiherr von Münchhausen, who lived in the 18th century.
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“The Jungle” is a novel written by Upton Sinclair, first published in 1906. The book is a muckraking work of fiction that exposed the harsh working conditions and unsanitary practices in the American meatpacking industry during the early 20th century. Sinclair intended the novel to highlight the exploitation of immigrant workers and to advocate for socialist reforms.
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“The Mark of Zorro” is a novel written by Johnston McCulley, first published in 1919. The story has been adapted into various films, television series, and other media over the years. The novel introduces the character of Zorro, a masked vigilante who defends the oppressed in Spanish California during the era of Mexican rule.
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“Oedipus King of Thebes” also known as “Oedipus Rex” and “Oedipus the King” is a famous tragedy written by the ancient Greek playwright Sophocles. The play was written around 429 BC, and is a classic work of Greek literature, still widely studied and performed today. It is known for its complex characters, compelling plot, and exploration of profound philosophical and psychological themes.
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“David Copperfield” is a classic novel written by Charles Dickens. It was first published as a serial between 1849 and 1850 and later released as a complete novel in 1850. The story is widely regarded as one of Dickens’s most autobiographical works, drawing on elements of his own life.
The novel is celebrated for its rich characterizations, intricate plot, and Dickens’s masterful storytelling. The novel has been adapted into numerous films, television series, and stage productions over t… Read More

“The Invisible Man” is a classic science fiction novel written by H.G. Wells. It was first published in 1897 and is considered one of Wells’ most famous works. The novel explores the theme of scientific ethics and the consequences of unchecked scientific experimentation.
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“The Sun Also Rises” is a novel written by American author Ernest Hemingway. It was published in 1926 and is considered one of Hemingway’s most famous works. The novel is often seen as a quintessential piece of literature from the “Lost Generation,” a term used to describe the disillusionment and aimlessness experienced by many individuals in the aftermath of World War I.
The story is primarily set in the 1920s and follows a group of expatriates, mainly American and British, as they na… Read More

“Poetry” is a collection of popular poems, written by Edgar Allan Poe. His poetry is renowned for its Gothic and melancholic themes, known for its musical and rhythmic qualities, and he often used rhyme and meter to create a haunting and atmospheric mood. His works have had a lasting impact on the genres of horror and Gothic literature, and he is considered one of the most significant and influential American writers of the 19th century.
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“Walden or Life in the Woods” is a book written by American transcendentalist author Henry David Thoreau. It was first published in 1854 and is a reflection on simple living in natural surroundings. The book is part personal declaration of independence, social experiment, voyage of spiritual discovery, satire, and manual for self-reliance.
Thoreau wrote “Walden” during a two-year period when he lived in a cabin he built near Walden Pond, located in Concord, Massachusetts. The book docume… Read More