Format - eBook

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“Les Misérables” by Victor Hugo is a monumental work of literature that delves into the intricacies of human suffering, redemption, and the pursuit of justice in 19th-century France. The novel intricately weaves together the lives of its diverse cast of characters, from the noble-hearted Jean Valjean to the relentless Inspector Javert, the tragic Fantine, and the idealistic revolutionary Marius Pontmercy. Through their intersecting narratives, Hugo paints a vivid portrait of a socie… Read More

Mark Twain’s “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” first published in 1884, is a cornerstone of American literature that explores themes of freedom, friendship, and moral growth through the journey of a young boy named Huck Finn. Escaping from his abusive father, Huck embarks on a raft journey down the Mississippi River, accompanied by Jim, a runaway slave seeking freedom. Their adventures and encounters with various characters reveal the social and racial injustices of the pre-Civ… Read More

“The Scarlet Letter” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, first published in 1850, is a classic work of American literature that delves into themes of sin, guilt, and redemption. Set in 17th-century Puritan Massachusetts, the novel follows Hester Prynne, a woman who bears an illegitimate child and is condemned to wear a scarlet letter “A” (for “adulteress”) on her chest as a mark of shame.
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“The Jungle” by Upton Sinclair, first published in 1906, is a seminal work of American literature that exposes the harsh realities of the meatpacking industry in Chicago. Sinclair’s novel follows the life of Jurgis Rudkus, a Lithuanian immigrant who arrives in America with dreams of prosperity, only to encounter exploitation, poverty, and despair. Through Jurgis’s harrowing experiences, Sinclair sheds light on the appalling working conditions, corruption, and lack of sani… Read More

“Backed by the Law” by Louis Masterson is a gripping Western novel that transports readers to the rugged landscapes of the American frontier.  Hardened by years of confronting outlaws and facing danger head-on, Kane embodies the spirit of the Old West with his unwavering commitment to justice and his relentless pursuit of those who break the law.
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“The Cougar Diaries Trilogy” by Jillian Godsil aka Aoife Brennan, is a bold and captivating exploration of modern relationships, self-discovery, and empowerment. Godsil skillfully captures the emotional depth and evolving dynamics of relationships. The book resonates with readers by addressing universal themes of love, self-acceptance, and the courage to defy societal expectations. Her narrative is both candid and humorous, providing a fresh perspective on the trials and triumphs of … Read More

“On the Nature of Things” (De Rerum Natura) by Titus Lucretius Carus is a seminal work of ancient Roman literature and philosophy, written in the 1st century BCE. This epic poem, composed in six books, aims to explain the physical world through the lens of Epicurean philosophy, which Lucretius ardently followed.
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New York Times Joseph Nassise continues his internationally bestselling Templar Chronicles series with Fall of Night!
Nassise’s rich character development and immersive world-building make “Fall of Night” a compelling read for fans of dark urban fantasy. His skilled storytelling plunges readers into a world where the lines between reality and the supernatural blur, with vivid descriptions and relentless pacing that keep readers on edge.
 
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“Bulldog Drummond” by H. C. McNeile, writing under the pseudonym Sapper, was first published in 1920. The novel introduces readers to Hugh “Bulldog” Drummond, an iconic figure in early 20th-century British adventure fiction. Drummond, a daring and resourceful ex-World War I officer, seeks excitement and purpose in a peacetime world. Bored with civilian life, he offers his services as a troubleshooter, quickly attracting attention for his fearless spirit and imposing prese… Read More

Giovanni Boccaccio’s “The Decameron” transports readers to 14th-century Italy during the devastating Black Death. In this vivid narrative, ten young Florentines—seven women and three men—flee their plague-stricken city to seek refuge in a serene villa in the countryside. To pass the time and keep their spirits high, they each take turns telling stories over ten days, culminating in a rich tapestry of one hundred diverse tales.
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“Cleopatra” by H. Rider Haggard is a historical novel published in 1889. Set in the ancient world, it blends historical facts with Haggard’s flair for adventure and romance. The story follows Harmachis, a young Egyptian prince destined to overthrow the Greek Ptolemaic dynasty and restore native rule to Egypt. His journey is fraught with danger and intrigue as he navigates the treacherous political landscape of ancient Egypt, where alliances shift like sand dunes in the desert.
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Richard Marsh’s “The Beetle” captivates readers with its thrilling blend of horror and mystery, set against the backdrop of late 19th-century London. Published in 1897, the novel weaves a tale of terror as it follows the sinister figure of a shape-shifting Egyptian beetle that wreaks havoc on the lives of those it encounters. The narrative unfolds through multiple perspectives, each adding layers of suspense and intrigue to the story. Marsh’s ability to create a palpable … Read More

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “Tales of the Jazz Age” captures the essence of the Roaring Twenties with a vibrant collection of short stories that explore the era’s exuberance, excess, and underlying disillusionment. Published in 1922, this anthology reflects Fitzgerald’s keen observations of the social dynamics and cultural shifts that defined the Jazz Age. Each story delves into different facets of the time, from the flamboyant lifestyles of the rich and glamorous to the … Read More

“Lysistrata” by Aristophanes is a timeless Greek comedy that unfolds against the backdrop of the Peloponnesian War, offering a bold and satirical commentary on the folly of war and the power of women. Written in the 5th century BCE, Aristophanes’ play centers around the eponymous heroine, Lysistrata, who hatches a daring plan to end the war by convincing the women of Greece to withhold sexual privileges from their husbands until they agree to negotiate peace. As Lysistrata̵… Read More

“Droll Stories” by Honoré de Balzac is a collection of ribald and satirical tales set in medieval France, filled with humor, wit, and irreverence. Balzac, a prolific French novelist and playwright, penned these tales in the mid-19th century as a departure from his more serious literary works, aiming to entertain and amuse his readers with bawdy and risqué narratives. Through a series of colorful characters and outrageous scenarios, Balzac explores the foibles and follies of human n… Read More

Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Canterbury Tales” transports readers to the vibrant and diverse world of medieval England, offering a panoramic view of society through the lens of a group of pilgrims journeying to the shrine of Thomas Becket in Canterbury. Written in Middle English in the late 14th century, Chaucer’s magnum opus is a rich tapestry of storytelling, wit, and social commentary. Through a series of interconnected tales told by a colorful cast of characters from vario… Read More

THERE’S MORE THAN ONE EARTH TO STEAL FROM
The Heist On Alpha Extended Special Edition includes the action-packed graphic novel, two spin-off short comics, and over 60 pages of extras. Immerse yourself in a high-octane adventure across alternate versions of Earth that reinvents the heist genre for a new generation.
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Gustave Flaubert’s “Madame Bovary” takes readers on a journey into the tumultuous life of Emma Bovary, a young woman trapped in the suffocating confines of bourgeois society in 19th-century France. As Emma grapples with the monotony of her provincial existence and yearns for a life of passion and excitement, she embarks on a series of ill-fated affairs and reckless pursuits in pursuit of her romantic ideals. Flaubert’s narrative skillfully depicts Emma’s descent int… Read More

In Friedrich Nietzsche’s seminal work, “The Genealogy of Morals,” readers are plunged into a philosophical exploration of the origins and development of moral values. Nietzsche challenges conventional notions of morality and traces its evolution from its primitive roots to its modern manifestations. With piercing insight and provocative rhetoric, he delves into the psychological, cultural, and historical forces that shape human ethics, offering a radical critique of traditional… Read More

“Twelve Years a Slave” recounts the harrowing true story of Solomon Northup, a free African American man who was kidnapped and sold into slavery in the antebellum South. Through Northup’s own vivid and compelling narrative, readers are transported to the brutal world of plantation life, where human beings are treated as property and subjected to unimaginable cruelty. As Northup struggles to maintain his dignity and humanity in the face of oppression, his story serves as a power… Read More

The Articles of Confederation, ratified in 1781, served as the first constitution of the United States, following the nation’s declaration of independence from British rule. Crafted by the Second Continental Congress, this document aimed to provide a framework for governance among the newly formed states. However, its structure reflected a cautious approach to central authority, as the colonists were wary of repeating the abuses they had experienced under British rule.
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“The Star and the Gun” is a riveting Western adventure that captures the essence of an iconic era in American history. Masterson’s evocative prose and authentic portrayal of frontier life transport readers to a world where honor, courage, and loyalty are put to the test amidst the backdrop of lawlessness and danger. With its blend of action, suspense, and heartfelt emotion, “The Star and the Gun” is a captivating tale that will keep readers on the edge of their seat… Read More

In “The Strangest Things in the World” by Thomas R. Henry, readers are taken on a fascinating journey through a myriad of oddities and curiosities from around the globe. With meticulous research and engaging storytelling, Henry uncovers the most bizarre phenomena and peculiar occurrences, inviting readers to delve into the extraordinary and the inexplicable. From natural wonders to supernatural encounters, each chapter presents a captivating exploration of the world’s strangest… Read More