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“Moby Dick” is a novel written by Herman Melville, first published in 1851. It is one of the most famous works of American literature and is considered a classic. The novel is known for its intricate and symbolic narrative, as well as its exploration of themes such as obsession, revenge, and the nature of good and evil.
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“Emma” is a novel written by Jane Austen, first published in 1815. It is one of Austen’s most well-known works and is considered a classic of English literature. The novel is a comedy of manners and a satire of the social class and gender roles of the early 19th century.
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Seneca’s “Dialogues” encompass diverse letters and essays, delving into a broad spectrum of philosophical themes and offering practical guidance for embracing Stoic principles in daily living.
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“Scary Fiction Shorts” showcases Lovecraft’s mastery of cosmic horror, where ancient and unknowable forces challenge human understanding, often leading to madness and despair.
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“The Scarlet Pimpernel” is a historical novel written by Baroness Emma Orczy, first published in 1905. The story is set during the Reign of Terror following the French Revolution and is known for its adventurous and swashbuckling elements.
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“The Critique of Pure Reason” is a philosophical work by Immanuel Kant, first published in 1781. It is one of Kant’s major works and is considered a cornerstone in modern Western philosophy. The book addresses fundamental questions about human knowledge, metaphysics, and the nature of reality.
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“Lady Chatterley’s Lover” is a novel written by D.H. Lawrence, first published privately in 1928. The novel explores themes of love, sexuality, and class struggle.
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“Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley is considered by many scholars to be the first official science-fiction novel ever written. Frankenstein has had considerable influence on literature and on popular culture, spawning a complete genre of horror stories, films, and plays.
Recording by Caden Vaughn Clegg
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“The Problems of Philosophy” is a philosophical work written by the British philosopher Bertrand Russell. It was first published in 1912. In this book, Russell explores various fundamental issues in philosophy, presenting his thoughts on topics such as the nature of reality, the limits of human knowledge, and the philosophy of language.
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The King James Bible (KJB), also known as The King James Version (KJV), and the Authorized Version (AV), is a classic English translation of the Bible. Commissioned by King James I of England and first published in 1611, it has had a profound impact on English literature and religious worship.
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The Quran, also known as Qur’an or Koran, is Islam’s central religious text, believed by Muslims to be a direct revelation from God.
 
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The Hebrew Tanakh represents the foundational religious and historical text for Judaism. It serves as a source of religious guidance, law, and inspiration for Jewish communities around the world.
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El libro “Don Quijote” fue escrito por Miguel de Cervantes. Publicado por primera vez en dos partes en 1605 y 1615, se considera una de las mayores obras de ficción.
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“Nicomachean Ethics” is a philosophical work by the ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle. It is named after Aristotle’s son, Nicomachus, to whom the work is dedicated. This ethical treatise, composed around 350 BCE, is part of Aristotle’s broader exploration of ethics and political philosophy.
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“Dream Psychology” is a book written by Sigmund Freud, the renowned Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis. Originally published in 1920, the book explores Freud’s theories on the interpretation of dreams and their connection to the unconscious mind.
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“The Voyage Out” is the first novel written by British author Virginia Woolf. It was published in 1915. The novel is a coming-of-age story, and it explores themes such as self-discovery, social conventions, and the constraints placed upon women in the early 20th century.
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The “Tao Te Ching” is a foundational text in Taoism, an ancient Chinese philosophical and religious tradition, written around 400 BC.
It is a collection of 81 short chapters, each containing poetic and philosophical verses. The text explores the concept of the Tao (Dao), which can be translated as the “Way” or the “Path.” The Tao represents the fundamental and unnameable force that underlies and unifies the universe.
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“The Surprising Adventures of Baron Munchausen” is a collection of tall tales and fantastical stories attributed to the German nobleman Baron Munchausen. The character Baron Munchausen was based on a real person, Hieronymus Karl Friedrich, Freiherr von Münchhausen, who lived in the 18th century.
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“A Treatise of Human Nature” is a philosophical work by the Scottish philosopher David Hume, first published in three volumes in 1739 and 1740. Hume is widely regarded as one of the most important figures in Western philosophy and a key figure in the Scottish Enlightenment.
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Aesop’s Fables are a collection of ancient moral tales attributed to Aesop, a storyteller believed to have lived in ancient Greece around the 6th century BCE.
These fables have endured through the centuries and remain popular as a source of wisdom and moral lessons.
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“Thus Spake Zarathustra” translated from “Thus Spoke Zarathustra” is a philosophical novel written by the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, published in four parts between 1883 and 1885. It is written in the form of a prose poem and is considered one of Nietzsche’s most significant and challenging works.
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Published in 1890, the book provides a fictionalized account of the world of gambling and the characters involved in the practice during the mid-19th century. The novel is set in the United States and explores the consequences of gambling and the vices associated with it.
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“The Jungle” is a novel written by Upton Sinclair, first published in 1906. The book is a muckraking work of fiction that exposed the harsh working conditions and unsanitary practices in the American meatpacking industry during the early 20th century. Sinclair intended the novel to highlight the exploitation of immigrant workers and to advocate for socialist reforms.
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“The Mark of Zorro” is a novel written by Johnston McCulley, first published in 1919. The story has been adapted into various films, television series, and other media over the years. The novel introduces the character of Zorro, a masked vigilante who defends the oppressed in Spanish California during the era of Mexican rule.
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